Month: August 2011

The Floating Cinema by Studio Weave and Somewhere

The Floating Cinema by Studio Weave and Somewhere

The Floating Cinema is a Ex-British Waterways boat, that has been converted into a compact moving-cinema by architects Studio Weave and artist duo, Somewhere (Consisting of Nina Pope and Karen Guthrie). The customised narrow boat is navigating the waterways of the five Olympic host boroughs this summer, including Tower Hamlets, Newham, Waltham Forest, and Hackney, and will feature free on-board screenings, quirky canal tours, talks and workshops. The project is part of the UP Projects’ Portavilion programme, a contemporary art project, which commissions temporary pavilions in east London. The old boat, originally called “Cole” and owned by Annie Myers and Hazel Saunders, was refurbished into the current cinema. The interior of the boat was fitted with 12 bespoke cinema seats and lined with blackout curtains, which were folded into a intricate pattern. Images: Studio Weave

Curtain Call by Ron Arad at the Roundhouse

Gabriel and Shira Klasmer Greenaway & Greenaway Fashion designer Hussein Chalayan Gabriel and Shira Klasmer Images: Creative Review Blog Last month, designer Ron Arad created this temporary cinema screen, which was installed in the Roundhouse, London, and consisted of a total of 5,600 silicon rods. Arad said of Curtain Call: “Walk in, penetrate, cross the moving images to get inside the cylinder. You’ll be engulfed by images – a captive, but also a creator. It’s amazing what exciting things happen on both sides of the curtain. I can’t wait.” The cylindrical space showcased films, live performances and installations until the 29th August. Although closed now, the images above and below show how the space was used and occupied with this colourful occupation of a theatre that has been open since 1846. Each day visitors could see work by Babis Alexiadis, Hussein Chalayan, Mat Collishaw, Ori Gersht, Greenaway & Greenaway, Christian Marclay, Javier Mariscal, SDNA, David Shrigley, and students from the Royal College of Art as part of the piece. Images: Dezeen

BP Portrait Award 2011

I went to the annual BP Portrait Award at the National Portrait Gallery today, a free exhibition showcasing the very best in contemporary portrait painting; “From intimate and personal images of friends and family, to revealing paintings of celebrity sitters, the exhibition presents a variety of styles and approaches that together illustrate the outstanding and innovative work currently being produced by artists of all ages and nationalities”. Five prize winners are shortlisted each year, but this year’s selection didn’t catch my eye as much as the painting’s I have selected below. Katherine (and Millie) by Barbara Skingle Barbara Skingle studied painting at Alberta College of Art and Concordia University, Montreal, Canada. Her work has been seen at the annual exhibitions of the Royal Society of Portrait Painters (1997, 2004) and in group exhibitions in Canada. The portrait is of Skingle’s daughter, Katherine, with the family’s pet canary, Millie. The portrait was created from a combination of sittings, reference photographs and memory. Katherine has sat for her mother on a number of occasions, who says: ‘Katherine is …

Just K by Architekten Martenson und Nagel Theissen

Just K by Architekten Martenson und Nagel Theissen

German studio Architekten Martenson und Nagel Theissen have designed this five-storey house in Tübingen, Germany. The grey facade is clad in rubber, which meets with raised seams, accentuating the envelope of this membrane-covered roof. The interior is clad with exposed softwood, forming an open living area on the ground floor, and wrapping up the stairs to create the bedrooms above. The house is fairly adaptable and can change according to the occupiers needs, for example two separate tenants could live in the building as there is a staircase to the first floor. This has been a trend that has been increasing with popularity in new build houses, does it create a warm, natural look for an interior, or are architects forsaking sustainability in favour of image? Images: Dezeen

Ingrid Dabringer’s witty map portraits

Canadian artist, Ingrid Dabringer creates these witty artworks by painting over existing maps of various countries, from the Manhattan subway to a geographic map of the Himalayas. She collects various maps and through their line work and patterns, creates paintings, that seek to find a kind of meaning, “We all move about on our own maps—in real time and space—as we become, endure, find, react—our life takes shape and we interpret our meaning.” Do the figures and characters have a meaning or are they just the result of a random meeting of roads, rivers and contour lines? She describes the thought process behind her work as; “The exaggerated and distorted images that I illustrate lend themselves nicely to the narrative questions of “why and how.” As I worked on the maps, I found myself remembering the Galapagos Islands, realizing I had never known where the Isle of Mann lies, and singing German lullabies. The process has taken me back to the places I’ve lived and the memories associated with them: Vienna, Jakarta, Beirut, Mexico City, Quito, …

Matthew Brandt- Lakes and Reservoirs

Matthew Brandt- Lakes and Reservoirs

Photographer Matthew Brandt, who lives and works in Los Angeles, California, creates these colourful photographs, which are almost like works of art in themselves. The unique effect is formed by soaking the printed colour photographs in the specific lake or reservoir that they represent.    Images: Dazed Digital

Absalon by Denzer & Poensgen

Whilst watching ‘The Secret Life of Buildings’ with Tom Dyckhoff on Channel Four, I decided to write about one of the features on the programme; the golden section. The golden section is an ideal in architecture where the proportions of the building are determined by a ratio that makes the design aesthetically pleasing. The golden ratio is an irrational mathematical constant, approximately 1.6180339887, for example with a rectangle, the ratio of the longer side to the shorter is the golden ratio. The golden section can be seen in nature, for example in the coil of a shell, the vertebrae of an animal and the veins on a leaf. Leonardo da Vinci also used the golden section in illustrations of polyhedra in De Divina Proportione (On the Divine Proportion) to demonstrate the proportions of the human body. Architects have been using the golden section to rationalise their designs and in a search to create the most pleasing buildings to the eye. Le Corbusier was one such advocate; “rhythms apparent to the eye and clear in their relations …

David Hanauer Google Earth Carpets

David Hanauer Google Earth Carpets

David Hanauer creates these amazing carpets, of patterned landscape, from screenshots taken from Google Earth. A bird’s eye view is taken over various cities and countries, from New York to the Arctic, and then reproduced and repeated to represent a pattern. The Munich-born designer took inspiration from traditional Persian carpets, with their ornate decoration, to form a project of 21st Century carpets, that combines ideas of identity, google and architecture. The aerial photography is transformed from town-planning and urban architecture into abstract designs, that are themselves beautiful. Images: David Hanauer

Royal Academy Summer Exhibition 2011

Royal Academy Summer Exhibition 2011

I finally got round to visiting the Summer Exhibition 2011 at the Royal Academy on Piccadilly. Unsurprisingly one of my favourite rooms was the Architecture Room, which this year was curated by Piers Gough, and Alan Stanton, who stated that the exhibition as a whole; ‘Encourages us to think about relationships between art and architecture – sculptural, conceptual and photographic.’ Piers Gough described his thoughts regarding the Architecture room itself, by explaining that architects are ‘so pleased to be in a major art show. Architecture is an art, and we owe it to the public to produce exhilarating work.’ Images: Andrew Putler The room was circulated around four podiums featuring physical models by both students and professionals, alongside drawings, collages and photographs hanging on the duck-egg blue wall. One of my favourite pieces of work was a model titled ‘Sub-Urbanism’ by Archmongers, who consist of Bartlett graduates Margaret Bursa and Johan Hybschmann. The project ‘Sub Urbanism’ questions the ever-enduring popularity of the 20th century suburb and how it fits within the contemporary socio-ecological model of housing shortage and …