Month: February 2012

Victor Enrich distorted photography

Victor Enrich distorted photography

Now these take some photoshop skill! Created by Spanish photographer, Victor Enrich, these images are digitally manipulated views of the city that form fantastical post-modernist structures. In a time when each ‘starchitect’ is competing for the title of ‘most creative building or ‘most advanced structure’, Enrich takes this to the extreme, with split skyscrapers, gigantic red postboxes and balancing staircases. Images: Victor Enrich

Dutch Mountain by Denieuwegeneratie

Dutch mountain is an underground house embedded in an artificial hill within a forest by Amsterdam design studio Denieuwegeneratie. The burying of the house simultaneously minimises the disturbance to the surrounding landscape, whilst also insulating the northern walls in the winter months. On the opposite side, the structure has been opened up with a wooden-framed glass facade, making the most of the southern light. The lark wood canopy regulates sunshine throughout the seasons, allowing for a split-level terrace at the ground floor. As explained by the architects; “The house is bold and unpredictable: an experiment in sustainable strategies in concept, structure, material and technical installations. A house that blends quietly in its surroundings, but stands out with spatial surprises.” I was as intrigued by the sustainable strategies of the architecture as the unusual interior decoration by the owners, especially that car bookshelf! Images: denieuwegeneratie

Stop, Look, Listen: Three things to do this week.

STOP. English National Ballet at Tate Britain. Tate Britain’s Duveen Galleries plays host to the English National Ballet company for a week as part of the current ‘Picasso and Modern British Art’ exhibition. From 10.30-11.45am visitors can watch company classes and rehearsals, and on Friday night (6.30pm, 7.15pm, 8pm, 8.45pm) a premiere of three ballets inspired by Picasso’s costume and set design for the Ballets Russes. See Tate website. Image LOOK. Last chance to see ‘Studio Life: Lucian Freud by David Dawson’ at the Hazlitt Holland-Hibbert Gallery on Bury Street. This exhibition shows photographs of Lucian Freud in his studio and at home, taken by his assistant, David Dawson, during the final years of his life. Image LISTEN. Film at The Yard. From the 29th February to the 25th March, a new theatre created from reclaimed site materials in Hackney Wick will be showing various film screenings, including ‘Reservoir Dogs’, ‘Breakfast at Tiffanys’ and ‘Requiem for a Dream’.  Tickets cost £9. Visit the-yard.co.uk to find out more. Image

Artists and their Studios- in The Times Magazine today

Artists and their Studios- in The Times Magazine today

An artist’s studio is their only properly private space, keeping the depths of themselves a mystery to the outside work, until a work comes into the limelight and enters the public’s domain. They can be fascinating spaces, accounting for years of unchecked creativity, and almost a work of art in their own right as they reveal so much about their owner. A new book, Sanctuary: Britain’s Artists and Their Studios is to be released on the 12th March by Thames & Hudson, showing 120 of the country’s artists in their workplaces. From Tracey Emin, to Grayson Perry and Lucian Freud, these photographs bring to light previously hidden and untouched interiors.  A quote taken from Cecile Debray’s, Lucian Freud: the studio, published on the occasion of the exhibition: ‘Lucian Freud: l’atelier’; “Freud works the walls in a double sense: over the thirty years or so of occupying his top flat studio at 36 Holland Park (1977-2009), he deposited dabs and smears of excess paint on available walls, gradually creating deeply textured surfaces of accumulated, hardened paste; during the same …

Vennesla Library and Cultural Centre by Helen & Hard

Stavanger-based Norwegian practice, Helen & Hard have recently completed a library and cultural centre in Vennesia, which features 27 prefabricated timber and CNC cut plywood ribs. These ribs inform the geometry of the roof, as well as the undulating orientation of the interior spaces, which create personal study zones nestled in between them. Each enclave contains glass panes that serve as lighting covers, and integrated reading niches with shelves for books. From the main entrance these gradually shifting shapes can be seen from the exterior, creating an inviting public space with a symbiosis of structure, furniture and interior design.  Images var linkwithin_site_id = 519459;

West Annandale Street by Tim Bayman Architecture

West Annandale Street by Tim Bayman Architecture

Shortlisted for the Architects’ Journal Small Projects Award, this home and office by Tim Bayman Architecture sees the refurbishment of an existing ground floor and basement property adjacent to a neighbouring Victorian terraced house in Edinburgh. A new pitched standing seam roof and lightwell, forming an additional mezzanine level, has been created on the ground floor alteration. The interior is now flooded with light from the new addition and finished with accents of bright yellow metal work.  Images: David Morris

Anish Kapoor's Studio by Caseyfierro Architects

Anish Kapoor's Studio by Caseyfierro Architects

With an artist such as Anish Kapoor, who is renowned for his large-scale sculptural works (so large in fact that Marsyas (2002) was commissioned for the Turbine Hall as part of the Tate Modern’s Unilever Series), a certain type of space is required; extremely large, and by that I mean larger than his quasi-architectural works. This was no mean feat for London-based Caseyfierro Architects, but previous experience for co-founders Michael Casey and Victoria Fierro at Herzog & de Meuron, and especially on the execution of the Tate Modern, provided the skills to do so. They have very successfully transformed a redundant building into a large, bright studio and archive space. An area of the existing first floor was removed and the roof remodelled to create a protruding volume with a translucent clerestory window, providing the perfect artist’s north light. The interior rooms provide varying spaces for different functions, from presentation and workshop space to upper levels for painting. Akin to an art gallery, the spaces offer blank, white walls and high windows to prevent external distraction …

Urville: An Autistic's Fascinating Imaginary City

These fascinating drawings of an imaginary city called ‘Urville’ are the result of 20 years work by autistic savant Gilles Trehin. Trehin has created this remarkably complex megacity with over 300 meticulously sketched drawings, each featuring a plethora of detail, from skyscrapers and business districts to public squares and meeting places. Even the minute detail has been thought over, from the social events of the city, the effects of World War II and the impact of industrialisation on the urban design of the city. To quote Trehin; “In 1789, during the French Revolution, Urville has 2.8 millions inhabitants, but the number of habitations became too limited to host the huge population growth due to the Industrial Revolution. In order to cope, the authorities of Urville call upon the famous town-planner Oscar Laballière (1803/ 1883) to start gigantic urban projects which are still outlining Urville even today.” This is a fantasy city which could be forgiven for tricking the mind into thinking it was reality such is it’s level of detail and dedication.  Images: Brainpickings

Kin Restaurant, a collaboration between Office Sian and Kai Design

Office Sian Architecture & Design and Kian Design have collaborated for the first time on this Chinese restaurant in Clerkenwell. The project involved the sensitive remodelling, redesign and refurbishment of an existing restaurant. Whilst maintaining the character of the original building with exposed brick walls and vintage flooring, new additions include a concrete bar and serving area, as well as bespoke furniture.  Images by James pfaff 

Stop, Look, Listen: Three things to do this week.

STOP: Mondrian and Nicholson in Parellel at The Courtauld Gallery. Apart from the most obvious reasons to visit Somerset House this week (as shown below), this exhibition explores the largely untold relationship between Piet Mondrian and Ben Nicholson during the 1930’s and offers an experience to see two masters of abstract art side by side. LOOK: London Fashion Week continues. Watch shows live here. Look forward to Peter Pilotto, Christopher Kane, Michael van der Ham, Erdem and Giles on Monday, and Mary Katrantzou, Peter Jensen and Meadham Kirchhoff on Tuesday. Above: Nicole Farhi LISTEN: BBC Radio Four’s Women’s Hour today- a special fashion focused edition, with blogger Susie Lau of Style Bubble, Maria Janssen, Creative Director of Fashion for forecasting company WGSN, Hilary Alexander from the Telegraph, and Caroline Rush, Chief Executive of the British Fashion Council to name a few.