Month: March 2012

Baixa House by Jose Adriao Arquitectos

Baixa House by Jose Adriao Arquitectos

Located in the heart of the historical district of Baixa, in Lisbon, and giving the project it’s name, Baixa House is a refurbishment of a traditional “Pombalino” building by Jose Adriao Arquitectos. Since its construction in the late 18th century, there has been a great deal of changes and modifications that deeply modified the original character of the building. The architect’s decision for the project was to accept this heritage, incorporating the changes of different times and complementing old with new. Images var linkwithin_site_id = 519459;

Alexis by Martin Jančok and Aleš Šedivec

Alexis by Martin Jančok and Aleš Šedivec

Nowadays it is becoming increasingly hard for small independent bookshops to compete, not only with firmly established booksellers on the high street, but also with the advent of digital devices such as the kindle. This small bookshop in Bratislava by Slovakian architects Martin Jančok of Plural and Aleš Šedivec of Totalstudio aims to create a flexible space to both sell books and also to facilitate various events such as workshops and lectures. A stepped wooden platform allows people to sit and look at books, but in addition can be filled up with spectators for an impromtu auditorium. Images: Plural var linkwithin_site_id = 519459;

Stop, Look, Listen: Three things to do this week.

var linkwithin_site_id = 519459; STOP. Brain: The Mind as Matter at the Wellcome Collection This major new free exhibition, starting from 29th March to the 17th June, explores what humans have done to brains in the name of medical intervention, scientific enquiry, cultural meaning and technological change. Featuring real brains, artworks, videos and photography, ‘Brains’ asks not what brains do to us, but what we have done to brains, focusing on the bodily presence of the organ rather than investigating the neuroscience of the mind. LOOK. Gillian Wearing at the Whitechapel Gallery.  From the 28th March to the 17th June, the Whitechapel Gallery is showing the work of Turner Prize-winning YBA artist Gillian Wearing, whose films and photographs explore our public personas and private lives. Drawing from early fly-on-the-wall documentaries and reality TV, Wearing’s portraits reveal a paradox- given the chance to dress up, put on a mask or act out a role, the liberation of anonymity allows us to more truly ourselves. Image LISTEN. Writing Madness on BBC Radio Four. Vivienne Parry takes her diagnoses of literary …

The Red House in Bexleyheath by William Morris

The Red House in Bexleyheath by William Morris

At the weekend I went to the Red House, just outside of London; the only house commissioned, created and lived in by William Morris, the founder of the Arts & Crafts movement and renowned for his floral patterned fabrics and furnishings. When it was completed in 1860, it was described by Edward Burne-Jones as ‘the beautifullest place on earth’. Morris lived with his wife Jane in the house for only five years, during which time their two daughters, Jenny and May, were born. Features to look out for include: hand painted tiles by Burne-Jones featuring Morris’s motto ‘si je puis’ (If I can), hidden murals by Morris concealed behind hinged panels in the living room, and don’t forget to look up to the ceiling for colourful painted patterns. (I also recently did a post about an exhibition on Morris, which was at Two Temple Place in London).   Hand painted tiles in the Pilgrim’s Porch featuring William Morris’s motto ‘si je puis’ Stained glass windows by Burne-Jones Cabinet by William Morris Aphrodite embroidery Dining room Hallway ceiling with …

Kärsämäki Shingle Church by Lassila Hirvilammi Architects

Kärsämäki Shingle Church by Lassila Hirvilammi Architects

This church in Kärsämäki, Finland, features a modern design but with hand-crafted 18th Century building methods, namely the tarred black shingles which envelope the building. Designed by Lassila Hirvilammi Architects from 1999 to 2004, on the back of a competition organised by the University of Oulu’s Department of Architecture, the church is both simple structurally and functionally. The simple forms owe something both to vernacular wooden churches and bell towers as well as pared-down contemporary architecture. This translates into two key forms; a weather-proof wooden core on the inside and an outer layer of shingles to protect the service spaces: the vestibule, vestry, and storage rooms. Images: Jussi Tiainen via Architonic

Boathouse by Norwegian firm TYIN

Andreas G. Gjertsen and Yashar Hanstad of TYIN tegnestue Architects tore down a dilapidated traditional Norwegian boathouse on the coastal Aure, recycled and reused some of the materials, to create a new building for recreational summer use. Previously used for storing boats and fishing gear, the old boathouse’s good placement and honest use of materials became key sources of inspiration for the new addition. A gabled roof was kept, with part of the structure resting on bare mountainous rock and clad in Norwegian pine, that will weather to produce a soft grey patina. Backlit cotton canvas shutters open up the boathouse to create a sheltered outdoor area. Images: TYIN

Maddie the Coonhound

Maddie the Coonhound

If you haven’t discovered this remarkable blog yet, let me introduce you to Maddie the Coonhound, a tumblr dedicated to photographer Theron Humphrey‘s pet perched on random things. It’s brilliant. Images: Maddie the Coonhound

Akihisa Hirata and Oak Structural Design Office: Bloomberg Pavilion

Akihisa Hirata and Oak Structural Design Office: Bloomberg Pavilion

Akihisa Hirata has teamed up with Oak Structural Design Office to build the Bloomberg Pavilion, which will become a platform for ten different exhibitions at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Tokyo. The design is based on a mathematical concept formulated by Kazushi Ahara, who describes the shape as a ‘hyplane’; a geometric system consisting of identical non-equilateral triangles. Images: Design Boom

St Catherine's College, Oxford by Arne Jacobsen

St Catherine's College, Oxford by Arne Jacobsen

Described by Pevsner as “a perfect piece of architecture”, St Catherine’s College in Oxford, designed by Arne Jacobsen, is one of the most modern colleges in the city, combining the features of a traditional quad with an ordered spatial module. Right down to the cutlery in the main hall, and the much copied wooden chairs, Jacobsen designed both interior and exterior with dedication and a certain Scandinavian flair for simplicity and crafting of materials. Images my own.