Month: June 2012

Bartlett Summer Show 2012

Bartlett Summer Show 2012

  The Bartlett Summer Show kicked off last Friday at the Slade School of Art in London. Featuring a cacophony of work, from first year to diploma, the week-long exhibition showcases the best of the architecture department at UCL (I may be a little biased, as I did go there myself…). Nevertheless, it is always a feast for the eyes, and in my opinion- since also going round the other London schools this week- one of the best in the country. From intricate hand-drawings and layered card models to rapidly moving zoetropes and inhuman computer renders, the Bartlett students have once again put on a fantastic show, both in the exhibition design (which they put together over an intensive week of framing, painting and welding) and the work within it. Unit 11: Super Urban Mega Listic Emma Flynn, Unit 11, Trash Can Utopias Janinder Bhatti, Unit 11, Sacrifical Flooding Janinder Bhatti, Unit 11, Sacrifical Flooding Martin Tang, Unit 10 Ned Scott, Unit 10 William Fisher, Unit 22 Unit 9, tutored by Max Dewdney and Chee-Kit Lai …

BIG designs a MÉCA to culture in Bordeaux, France

BIG, headed by Danish Bjarke Ingels, has recently won a competition with French practice FREAKS freearchitects (which I think is a fantastic name!), to design a new Maison de l’Economie Creative et de la Culture en Aquitaine (MÉCA). The new 12,000 m2 cultural centre will merge the three existing visual and performing arts centres; FRAC, ECLA, and OARA, into one institution facing the riverfront of Bordeaux. The white perforated box of the new complex is arranged around a central public space, open towards the Garonne River, and relating to the waterfront promenade by a continuous loop of performance and film spaces, from the lobby to the sky-lit galleries above. As Bjarke Ingels says; “Not only does the MÉCA spill its activities into the public realm and the urban room, but the public is also invited to walk around, through, above and below the new cultural gateway. By inviting the art into the city and the city into the arts, the MÉCA will provide opportunities for new hybrids of cultural and social life beyond the specific …

Claudio Parentela

Claudio Parentela

Italian artist, illustrator and photographer, Claudio Parentela recently emailed over these collages to Studio 325. Reminiscent of Prada’s recent Pop Art inspired Spring 2012 lookbook in a past post, they combine fashion photographs layered with Picasso and Matisse-esque scribbles and marks. Images courtesy Claudio Parentela

A Case History by John King in Liverpool

A Case History by John King in Liverpool

Recently I wrote a post about some concrete bollards disguised as Berlin tower blocks by graffiti artist EVOL (see it here). Whilst in Liverpool last weekend I stumbled across this unusual concrete installation on Hope Street by artist John King. Titled ‘A Case History’, the public artwork features concrete casts of suitcases, trunks and guitar cases of famous residents of Liverpool. var linkwithin_site_id = 519459; Images my own

JOH 3 by J. Mayer H. Architects

JOH 3 by J. Mayer H. Architects

I recently wrote a post about J. Mayer H. Architects’ recent work in Georgia (here). The Berlin-based practice have now realised a residential building in their hometown, situated between Museum Island and Friedrichstrasse. The most striking feature of the building is the sculptural design of the suspended slat facade that envelops the glass; the pattern mimicking the natural shapes of the green interior courtyard within. This is something that has become something of a trademark for the architects. The quirky pattern in this building is even extended to the tiling of the bathrooms. Images

Glass House by Naf Architect & Design

Glass House by Naf Architect & Design

Japanese practice Naf Architect & Design, based in Tokyo, have recently completed this seaside house in Etajima, Hiroshima. The structure is formed partly from chunky 1x1x1.5 concrete blocks, echoing the adjacent retaining sea walls that protect the coastline from storm waves. They were manufactured at a  low cost from surplus cement and unused concrete from a nearby factory, and will be reinforced with metal bars during seismic events. The result when stacked together, is a private inlet away from the seaside walkway, that protects against the wind and direct sunlight. Images