All posts tagged: Decor

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#theeverydayspruce: The joys of vinyl + playlist

Vinyl is having a bit of a renaissance at the moment. There’s just something about pulling out your favourite record, admiring the cover, and taking the moment to put it on and actually listen, rather than multitasking with other things. It clarifies the mind and can be a really soothing antidote to a busy day. So often music is just on in the background, whilst we go about the hustle and bustle of our everyday lives. It’s far more relaxing, and better for the soul, I think, to take a lazy morning with your favourite vinyl, a fresh pot of coffee on standby or have a group of your besties round for some cocktails and vintage tunes. In our house, we never really had a music station or a hi-fi at all, we would just use our laptop or phone, which looking back, just sounded a bit tinny and soulless. Or I would have my favourite Classic FM on an old Robert’s radio in the background. But, at Christmas I got the wonderful gift of …

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10 must-have Spring cushions for the home

It definitely feels like Spring is just around the corner, the sun’s beginning to show it’s face, it’s getting lighter in the evenings and Spring bulbs are starting to crop up everywhere. During the winter months, the balcony of my flat might as well not exist, but after a little trip to Columbia Road flower market at the weekend, a cluster of hyacinths and daffodil sprouts are quietly making their home there. If you’re anything like me, you’ll like a Spring clean inside too. One of the easiest, commitment-free (compared to an entire wall of wallpaper for example) and sometimes cheapest ways to spruce up a home, in my opinion, is with a good old cushion. Here are ten lovely, Spring-like cushions to get you in the mood for sunshine and fresh breezes; my favourites are the cool blue tones of Marimekko’s Meriheinä cushion (3) and Nautical objects cushion by Rosie Moss for Heal’s (8). Inspired by mid-century textiles and British vernacular art, the cushion mixes maritime motifs in a charming print (who doesn’t like a Breton …

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Ferm Living's new Spring/Summer 2015 collection

As some regular readers may know, I’m a big fan of Danish interior design brand Ferm Living, so when I saw that they had just released a new Spring/Summer collection for 2015, I knew I had to share it with you all. While their Autumn/Winter collection was moody, cosy and homely, this season they’ve gone all fresh and clean, with lots of clean lines, their signature geometric patterns and plenty of vibrant, green plants. I would just love a little conservatory in my home like the one below. I have to say my favourites are the new grey ‘Cut Bed’ cover (the illustration’s by Alyson Fox, you can see here gorgeous home in Austin, Texas on Freunde von Freunden) and the Stamp tea towels, what are yours? See the full catalogue here.

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Dar Mim by Septembre architects

Paris-based architect Septembre has completed the renovation and extension of a traditional courtyard house in the historic heart of the city Hammamet in Tunisia (incidentally, as I write this post, I can’t help but hum along to Earth, Wind & Fire’s September… “do you rememberrr, the 21st night of Septemberrr, ba duda, badu, ba duda…). As January sets in, with its dark and wet weather here in London, this blindingly-bright home is the perfect remedy. It makes me want to book a holiday immediately, pack my bags and say goodbye to stormy England. The building itself was converted piecemeal over time, retaining a mixture of solids and voids that provide light and much-needed natural ventilation. The project organises the main living spaces around two open courtyards, creating a series of horizontal and vertical connections. All the woodwork and metalwork were made by local artisans, while traditional plaster and limewash has been used to create the whiter-than-white exterior walls. A two-story extension features a guest room and its own terrace accessed from a new staircase. There’s …

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I wish I lived here: a clean, white Swedish home

As soon as it turned January 1st I had the urge to tear down all the Christmas decorations and have a spring (or winter) clean. Just as people like to make resolutions for their body, to be leaner and fitter, so I like my home to go on a detox: clean surfaces, fresh flowers and new magazines on the coffee table. I would love my home to be as clean and white as this one in Gothenburg; I love the white washed floors and white walls. It just looks so fresh, but the suede sofa and rustic wooden table stop it from looking too cold. What I would do for that light turquoise Smeg fridge too! This leather chair looks so comfy, while the unit raised off the ground extends the room slightly and makes it look bigger.   These black cafe chairs and rustic wooden table look great against the white walls. I spy my favourite String shelving unit… All images: Stadshem

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Pantone Colour of the Year 2015: Marsala

Global colour authority Pantone has chosen the ‘rich and charismatic’ colour of Marsala for its Colour of the Year 2015. Each year, for the past 15 years, Pantone combs the world looking for colour influences, from the fashion and beauty industries to the world of art, interior and graphic design. Influences can also stem from technology, new materials and textures, and even upcoming sports events. This year, the rich and full-bodied red-brown Marsala is deep and earthy, reminding me of lady-like red lipsticks, textured, ethnic throws and kilims, and the earthy tones of red sand dunes. And while I still love my clean, (mostly-white) Scandinavian interiors, Marsala can still be used in the home – in moderation. Perhaps a kilim throw here, a soft cushion there, a linen napkin there, rather than a whole room painted in this very powerful colour. Pantone predicts that it will be popular in striping and floral patterns found in printed placemats, dinnerware, bedding and throws. But if like me, you’re still hanging onto your neutral greys and whites, here are a couple of examples of …

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I wish I lived here: a calming Scandinavian home with a festive touch

Just a quick post today. While searching for Scandinavian-inspired Christmas decor for my tree this year, I came across this calming Swedish home on the property website Stadshem. Here, they have kept the decorations to a bare minimum, but there’s still a hint of festivity, with a mini potted fir tree in the living room as well as sprouting hyacinth bulbs in glass jars on the dining room table. I immediately did the same at home this weekend using old Bonne Maman jam jars; super simple and super easy. They make a very quick but beautiful centrepiece for the Christmas table, especially if you add the odd tealight to bounce light off the shiny glass. Aside from the vaguely Christmas spirit, I love the stripped floorboards and white walls, made cosy with the patterned cushions and a scattering of HAY side tables. Images: Stadshem, styled by Emma Hos

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Styling the Seasons: December

Yay, it’s the December Styling the Seasons, I’m a bit excited about this one, because guess what, it’s nearly Christmas! (I’m listening to Classic FM as I write this, with Christmas carols playing in the background and I’m still in my pyjamas…). I mean what else could I style up this month except for a Christmas tree, albeit a rather untraditional affair. There’s no tacky tinsel, red baubles or twinkly fairy lights here! This soft, woolly tree is from Habitat last year but they have a similar one online at the moment in copper. I decided to style it with a similar colour palette to my living room: duck egg blues, soft greys and clean white to get that Scandinavian feel. December started off really well, I was extremely lucky and won a super-duper hamper from Toast in an Instagram competition (eeeeeekk!) I never win anything! So, the beautifully patterned crackers are from there – can’t wait to crack them open come Christmas day – as are the brass tree decorations, which I probably would never have been able to afford (£24 …

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I wish I lived here: a monochrome home in Stockholm

This three bedroom apartment in Stockholm has been styled in three completely different ways by three different stylists. My personal fave is the moody, monochrome look seen here, created by stylist and writer Tina Hellberg. While Hans Blomquist opted for a dark, almost festive look, and Mikael Beckman a bright, blingy vibe, Tina has created a calming space using natural tones, accents of chocolate brown and modern Scandinavian furniture. I love the use of sharp, black lighting and Ray Eames’ Small Dot cushion (above and below) that seems to have inspired the whole scheme. Painting a wall half black is good idea too (see the desk space below), especially, if like me, you’re a bit cautious of using dark colours everywhere… Images: Fastighetsbyran

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I wish I lived here: a Berlin apartment styled by New Tendency

Whenever I want a dose of smart, cool, Scandi-inspired interiors, I can always count on Fantastic Frank. This newly renovated home in Berlin is located in a building from the turn of the century, and although it may look like any other modern apartment, there are some surprisingly delightful details, such as the kitchenette made of old airplane storage. I can certainly say I have never seen an airplane kitchen before, but practically speaking it’s very clever, with small compartments all neatly lined up in a row. The rooms of the apartment were styled by Sarah van Peteghem in collaboration with Berlin-based design studio New Tendency, who also designed the yellow, t-shaped ‘Meta’ side table shown. The table, made of powder-coated steel, has horizontal and vertical storage for books and magazines as well as a top that looks delicate and thin or substantial and full depending on the angle you’re looking at. The shelving in the last image is also by New Tendency. Called Shift, it consists of modular elements, which can be easily stacked vertically on top of each other and moved …