Bohemian workspace. Proving Scandi needn't be all white: inside The Home, Copenhagen by Ferm Living. Image: Cate St Hill

Proving Scandi interiors needn’t be all white: inside The Home, Copenhagen by Ferm Living

While I was in Copenhagen recently, I couldn’t resist squeezing in a visit to Ferm Living’s brand-new showroom in the heart of the city. Looking over the central square of Amagertorv, The Home is a beautiful, old apartment designed to showcase Ferm Living’s ethos – namely, what home means to this well-known Danish brand. Spread across five rooms, their furniture designs, lighting, homeware and textiles are carefully curated to create a space where you want to linger and stay a while. Or preferably forever… The question on everyone’s lips when they visit –’ can I move in?’

For me, the richly hued space is also a lesson in how to use colour to bring a sense of warmth and feeling to an interior. If you read this blog, then like me, you’re probably partial to a light-filled, monochrome Scandinavian space, but if used well and in just the right places, colour can be clean and minimal too.

To be honest, I’m a little scared of using colour; worried that I’ll tire of it quickly and have to start decorating all over again. I like creating timeless, elegant spaces that don’t go out of fashion. If anything, The Home showed me that Scandinavian interiors needn’t be all white and being bold with colour can create brilliant, inspiring effects. Who would have thought to paint the ceiling of the living space, below, in a deep burgundy red-brown? I certainly wouldn’t but it somehow works, grounding the space and creating a cosy setting.

Warm autumnal living room. Neutral Decor. Proving Scandi needn't be all white: inside The Home, Copenhagen by Ferm Living. Image: Cate St Hill
The Living space of Ferm Living’s The Home

The brand’s A/W17 collection, also titled The Home, has a hint of Nordic decadence, merging the clean lines and shapes of Scandinavian design with vibrant colours, rich materials and textures. Designs have an element of understated luxury and refined sophistication.

‘It’s that certain scent, a familiar atmosphere, walls that know your name. So much more than just a place, The Home is where we feel at ease. It’s the space that lets us grow into who we wish to become. It’s where we are who we are.’ Ferm Living

Ferm Living’s minimal Turn Sofa, above, for instance, is complemented with their Herman Lounge Chair and Borders Kelim Rug. The space has an autumnal look that perfectly suits this time of year as the evenings get shorter and we long to be inside at home.

Neutral decor and blush pink touches. Proving Scandi needn't be all white: inside The Home, Copenhagen by Ferm Living. Image: Cate St Hill
Beautifully curated details and brass finishes
Warm autumnal living room. Neutral Decor. Proving Scandi needn't be all white: inside The Home, Copenhagen by Ferm Living. Image: Cate St Hill
Deep earthy colours ground the rooms. Piles of magazines give a lived-in feel to the showroom space
Warm autumnal living room. Neutral Decor. Proving Scandi needn't be all white: inside The Home, Copenhagen by Ferm Living. Image: Cate St Hill
Huge windows bring in natural light

Spaces at The Home are prevented from appearing too dark and oppressive by the huge windows that bring natural light in.

Bohemian workspace. Proving Scandi needn't be all white: inside The Home, Copenhagen by Ferm Living. Image: Cate St Hill
Artworks and rolls of paper give the feel of an art studio
Bohemian workspace. Proving Scandi needn't be all white: inside The Home, Copenhagen by Ferm Living. Image: Cate St Hill
An autumnal workspace with bohemian touches. Ferm Living Mingle Table and Frame Pinboard

Colour can also be used to delineate spaces and create zones, like with this corner workspace. It humanises the tall space by bringing the eye level down to the level of the desk and chair.

Bohemian workspace. Proving Scandi needn't be all white: inside The Home, Copenhagen by Ferm Living. Image: Cate St Hill
Ferm Living’s Frame Pinboard provides the perfect surface for gathering inspiration
Bohemian workspace. Proving Scandi needn't be all white: inside The Home, Copenhagen by Ferm Living. Image: Cate St Hill
Signing the guestbook in The Home
Bohemian workspace. Proving Scandi needn't be all white: inside The Home, Copenhagen by Ferm Living. Image: Cate St Hill
Touches of greenery help create an inspiring workspace
Bohemian workspace. Proving Scandi needn't be all white: inside The Home, Copenhagen by Ferm Living. Image: Cate St Hill
Punctual Shelving help organise office equipment
Bohemian workspace. Proving Scandi needn't be all white: inside The Home, Copenhagen by Ferm Living. Image: Cate St Hill
Carefully curated touches
Bohemian workspace. Proving Scandi needn't be all white: inside The Home, Copenhagen by Ferm Living. Image: Cate St Hill
Ferm Living’s Collect pendant with a decorative brass ring

Using colour on the panelling brings out the period details, but if your home is not blessed with the same elements, painting the skirting boards and door frames in a contrasting colour to the walls can add interest and hue without painting the whole room. Perfect for people like me who are bit hesitant to go the whole hog!

Neutral decor and blush pink touches. Proving Scandi needn't be all white: inside The Home, Copenhagen by Ferm Living. Image: Cate St Hill
Blush pink wooden panelling in the bedroom space
Neutral decor and blush pink touches. Proving Scandi needn't be all white: inside The Home, Copenhagen by Ferm Living. Image: Cate St Hill
Create datum lines and interest with paint

Deep green in the kitchen was another revelation for me. Sometimes kitchens can look clinical and bare, but this space is warm and inviting. The green has been used sparingly – on one wall, around the kitchen units and for the kitchen units themselves. Sections of white and the white frames of the windows stop the space feeling too dingy. The colour makes features and accessories really pop too.

Dark green kitchen. Proving Scandi needn't be all white: inside The Home, Copenhagen by Ferm Living. Image: Cate St Hill
Deep, dark green in the kitchen contrasts with Ferm Living’s stoneware
Dark green kitchen - utensil storage ideas. Proving Scandi needn't be all white: inside The Home, Copenhagen by Ferm Living. Image: Cate St Hill
Shelves and a brass pole provide a space to display utensils
Dark green kitchen. Proving Scandi needn't be all white: inside The Home, Copenhagen by Ferm Living. Image: Cate St Hill
Kitchen tools featuring Ferm Living’s Cork Coaster and Outline Trivet
Dark green kitchen. Proving Scandi needn't be all white: inside The Home, Copenhagen by Ferm Living. Image: Cate St Hill
Dark green kitchen units

If the use of colour still seems a little scary, add it slowly with accessories, such as Ferm Living’s Green Plant Box. Plants and herbs in the kitchen also add life and help create a happy, healthy space.

Dark green kitchen. Proving Scandi needn't be all white: inside The Home, Copenhagen by Ferm Living. Image: Cate St Hill
Natural materials and greenery with Ferm Living’s new Still Teapot
Dark green kitchen. Proving Scandi needn't be all white: inside The Home, Copenhagen by Ferm Living. Image: Cate St Hill
Copper pans in the kitchen

Shop the look:

Dark green kitchen. Proving Scandi needn't be all white: inside The Home, Copenhagen by Ferm Living. Image: Cate St Hill
Mixing textures, and old and new
Dark green kitchen. Proving Scandi needn't be all white: inside The Home, Copenhagen by Ferm Living. Image: Cate St Hill
Original panelling and a pendant light create a cosy kitchen corner

I hope Ferm Living’s has inspired you to be bolder with colour too. I’ll certainly be testing out some ideas in my own home, watch this space!

Dark green kitchen. Proving Scandi needn't be all white: inside The Home, Copenhagen by Ferm Living. Image: Cate St Hill
Kitchen utensils create a dynamic display

The Home is not open to the public unfortunately, but you can get another look at the spaces with this video on Ferm Living’s site.

All images: Cate St Hill

  1. With feature-rich rooms like those it’s easy to experiment with colour (those windows!). I am a bit scared of it too, to be honest. I like the idea of painting the woodwork in a contrasting colour.

    • Yes I am too, I wouldn’t be this brave! But it looks so rich and wonderful, painting the skirting boards and woodwork a different colour is a great introduction! x

  2. Such a gorgeous tour Cate, I agree, I want to move in!! My wish list from the new Ferm Living collection is immense! As you know I’m always the argument between light pared back and colourful, I think you’re so right about skirting boards and doors as great ways of adding colour without being intimidated, as you say ceilings too, im so persuaded by this but have never had the guts to do it. Beautiful pictures as ever x

  3. This might sound odd, but I actually find working with white much harder than working with colour. For example, my living room is painted in inchyra blue from farrow and ball, and I feel quite happy pairing that with all sorts of colours – I have deep leather chairs, and accessories in different greys, blush/faded pinky reds and even a flash of mustard. My white study, on the other hand, feels messy and unfinished, even though I approached it with a much more definite plan. In general as well, I think dark colours are much easier to work with than most ones, because they give such a strong base – but they can be just as ‘neutral’ as a white or beige kind of base.

    • That’s interesting, I think I’m the opposite ha! I’m not very confident with using colour but can put together greys and and neutrals quite easily. The boldest I’ve gone in the house in Farrow & Ball’s Peignoir (a light pink grey), but I think I need to be much braver! I agree, white can look a bit cold and harsh in some lights, my previous flat used to be all white, but now I prefer using a very light grey or off white instead, those hues have a much warmer feel to them. Dark colours can definitely be neutral as well, I love the look of dark greys and deep blues (maybe I should try one in my home office I’m about to decorate!), I think it’s all about what you pair it with and how many different shades you use with it before it gets too busy. Cate xx

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